Meet Chairman of Ukraine Parliament, Puan Pushes for Peace Between Ukraine and Russia

Indonesian Speaker of the House Dr. (H.C.) Puan Maharani, held a bilateral meeting with the Chairman of the Verkhovna Rada of Ukraine, Olena Kondratiuk. In the meeting, Puan pushed for peace between Ukraine and Russia, which are currently still at war.

The bilateral meeting was held ahead of the opening of the 8th G20 Parliamentary Speakers’ Summit (P20) at the DPR RI Building, Senayan, Jakarta, Wednesday, 5 October 2022. Puan also expressed concern over the war in Ukraine which caused many casualties and had an impact on the global situation in the world.

“Our special invitation to the Ukraine Parliament at P20, is our concrete step to assist communication among Parliaments in resolving the war in Ukraine,” said Puan.

Puan expressed appreciation that the bilateral relation between Indonesia and Ukraine, which had existed for 30 years, is still well maintained despite uncertain regional situation due to war. Indonesia is one of Ukraine’s largest trading partners in Southeast Asia.

“I understand that the war in Ukraine has affected our efforts in the economy after the Covid-19 pandemic. Therefore, the peace process is Indonesia’s top priority,” said Puan.

 “The visit of the President of Indonesia to Ukraine and Russia in June was carried out to bring a message of peace. The visit also to ensure safe passage for food and fertilizer from both Ukraine and Russia,” continued the Indonesia’s first female Speaker of the House.

Puan added that Indonesia welcomes the resumption of grain exports from Ukraine via Black Sea. This agreement plays an important role in reducing the impact of war on global supply chains.

“Of course, this positive step must also be followed by easy access to export food and fertilizer products from Russia, as agreed in the Istanbul agreement,” explained Puan.

The former Coordinating Minister for Human Development and Cultural Affairs also hoped that other countries will respect the agreement. Puan asked all countries to ensure balanced implementation of the Istanbul Agreement and hoped that the initiative would also bring peace in the Region.

“Indonesia hopes that the initiative to open the food supply chain will continue for the common interest of all parties,” she said.

It is known that Ukraine and Russia signed an agreement in Istanbul last July to deliver millions of tons of Ukrainian wheat to global market to alleviate the worsening food crisis for millions of people in developing countries. Ukraine itself is the second largest supplier of wheat to Indonesia.

In meetings with other parliamentary leaders, Puan continues to encourage the international community to continue to support dialogue and diplomacy as an effort to deal with the war between Ukraine and Russia. She also emphasized Indonesia’s position on the conflict between the two countries.

Indonesia upholds the goals and principles of the UN charter and international law regarding the war between Ukraine and Russia, such as peaceful resolution of dispute and upholding territorial integrity and country’s sovereignity.

Indonesia sees that the referendum in the 4 regions of Ukraine violates the principles of the UN charter and international law. Indonesia encourages Russia and Ukraine to continue to open dialogue and diplomacy, as one of the efforts to end the war and lead to peace,” said Puan.

Puan then mentioned the results of the 144th Inter-Parliamentary Union (IPU) General Assembly in Bali last March which agreed to form an IPU Task Force on Ukraine in which Indonesia was one of the countries initiated the Task Force. According to Puan, the IPU Task Force is also expected to mediate differences between Russia and Ukraine, as well as facilitate communication between the two countries.

“Indonesia has also been the country that initiated the resolution on the Russia-Ukraine conflict at the 144th General Assembly in March. As a follow-up to this, the Indonesian House’s Chairperson of Committee for Inter-Parliamentary Cooperation visited Ukraine last July to open a dialogue to end the conflict,” continued the Chair of the 144th IPU General Assembly.

Indonesia together with the IPU task force will later present the results of the visit to Ukraine at the 145th IPU General Assembly which will be held in Kigali, Rwanda in October 2022.

On the other hand, the DPR continues to ensure that bilateral relations between parliaments can be established even better, including with Ukraine. Puan hoped that the Bilateral Cooperation Group with the Ukrainian Parliament can further strengthen relations between the two countries.

“The DPR RI sees the importance of parliamentary diplomacy, both bilateral and multilateral, at the regional or global level because the war in Ukraine has had a serious impact on many countries in the world, particularly related to food supply (wheat and fertilizer) and energy,” she concluded.

P20 to Strengthen Solidarity Against Global Crisis

The Indonesian Coordinating Minister for Economics, Airlangga Hartanto, represented the government in appreciating the parliamentary forum held before the G20 Summit, namely the Parliamentary Speaker’s Summit (P20). He considered the forum to be the gate for opening dialogues between countries to solve global crises around the world.

“We are gathered here today as the world is changing rapidly. We call it as the challenge of “the perfect storm”, which is the multidimensional crisis. Without hesitation, security, economic, and environmental challenges have delayed our attempts to expedite recovery,” Airlangga delivered his opening remarks in front of the leaders of the House of Representatives (DPR) and P20 delegates at the Nusantara II Building, Senayan, Jakarta, on Wednesday (October 5, 2022).

In the same opportunity, he emphasized that global crises can only be addressed together with a strong sense of solidarity. Airlangga said that without such spirit, it will cause egos to arise among countries that will complete them in surviving the global challenges.

He also explained that Indonesia, as a country that strives to maintain solidarity amid the COVID-19 pandemic, was able to record economic growth of 5.44 percent as of Q2 of 2022. Therefore, he wishes countries, especially the G20 members, to prioritize solidarity in facing food crises, inflation, and climate change.

“We can only address those challenges when we are united with a strong sense of humanity and solidarity. As we are gathered here today, the world is looking at us with expectations to bring betterment for the people, for your constituents back home,” he said.

Therefore, Airlangga stressed that the working groups and engagement groups in G20, such as P20, must provide comprehensive solutions to global crises, especially in the economic sector. He hopes that the G20 has “deliverable” values that can guide and simultaneously be implemented in countries attending the G20. Indonesia is taking several measures to anticipate global crises. One of them is through launching a program to encourage MSMEs with microcredit loans. The financing scheme is expected to build food security in Indonesia. Several countries that know this program have shown their desire to replicate the financing scheme, which also attracts the attention of the World Bank.

Puan Expects the P20 to Produce Concrete Actions to Combat Climate Change.

On P20, a series of events of the 8th G20 Parliamentary Speakers’ Summit (P20), which will be officially opened tomorrow, Thursday, 6 October, the chairman of the House of Representatives of the Republic of Indonesia Dr. (H.C) Puan Maharani expressed the hope that P20 could create an agenda that could strengthen each country’s ability to respond to and deal with various global problems.

She asserted that now is the time for world countries to take action in order to lower emissions globally, quicken the transition to renewable energy sources, and undertake financial assistance and technology transfers for developing countries.

“Extreme weather, droughts, floods, and other natural disasters occur more frequently and one after another. The degree of global warming has risen to 1.1 Celsius. We need to act with urgency,” said Puan during her speech at the Parliamentary Forum in the Context of the G20 Parliamentary Speakers’ Summit (P20), which was held at the Nusantara II Building DPR RI, Senayan, Jakarta, Wednesday, on 5 October 2022.

According to Puan, the world has to develop people-centered climate change mitigation. “Building awareness and a commitment to preserve and support nature and the environment is the first step in people-centered mitigation. The next stage involves a common will in building a world order of industrial ecosystems and an environment-friendly economy,” she explained.

Puan said that it was important to change human mentality so that we stopped simply taking from nature but also helped it go back to a healthy ecosystem. The ability to tackle the root issues also requires realistic and real cooperation between nations and countries.

“That is managing the global economic competition and industry that can contribute to the environmental recovery. Industry must be able to help nature recover as well as take from it. A systematic and massive mitigation recovery program,” said Puan.

In order to strengthen international parliamentary cooperation for climate change adaptation and mitigation, parliament must also become increasingly aware of its strategic role. The issue, according to Puan, became a common concern, including at the 144th IPU General Assembly Session, which took place in Bali in March.

In fulfilling the mandate of the international parliamentary forum, the Indonesian House of Representatives, she continued, has taken concrete steps to support climate change mitigation and adaptation by strengthening sustainable development and a green economy.

This concrete step was realized by proposing the New Energy and Renewable Energy Bill (RUU EBET) as an initiative proposed by the DPR RI. In addition, the DPR RI complex will begin utilizing solar cells to supply 25% of the building’s electricity needs. Finally, Puan hoped that the highly strategic P20 meeting could result in concrete commitments and actions for mitigating and adapting to the impacts of climate change.

Additionally, it is connected to the intricacy of global issues that necessitate collaboration between all parties, not just the government, but also the parliament, business community, academic community, and civil society. “Hopefully, the P20 Inter-parliamentary Forum’s discussion today on the role of parliament in promoting multilateralism in the twenty-first century and addressing climate change will result in a useful common agenda.

Vice Minister Angela Attends Welcoming Dinner for WCCE Delegation at Pasifika Museum, Bali

Nusa Dua, October 5th 2022 – Vice Minister of Tourism and Creative Economy/Deputy Head of Tourism and Creative Economy Agency, Angela Tanoesoedibjo, attended the Welcoming Dinner for World Conference on Creative Economy (WCCE) Delegation organized by Traveloka.

She looked elegant wearing a brown and black batik dress when arriving at the Pasifika Museum, Nusa Dua, Bali, Wednesday (5/10/2022). Angela was greeted by Traveloka CEO, Albert, who wore Balinese traditional clothes complete with udeng (Balinese traditional headband) around his head.

The Pasifika Museum was chosen as the location for the dinner because it was considered to a have high creative economic value. This museum also features various cultures from countries in Asia and the Pacific, as well as various kinds of cultural artifacts. The Pasifika Museum was founded in 2006 by Moetaryanto and Philippe Augier.

This museum stores many items related to art, there are more than 600 works of art by 200 artists from 25 countries. Therefore, inside this museum there are many galleries with various categories.

The Vice Minister Angela also had time to look around the museum, and see the items and collection of paintings that are divided into groups from various countries.

Then, during the gala dinner, Angela and the delegation were treated to Balinese typical cuisines with special tea drinks. In addition to the typical culinary delights of the Island of the Gods, cultural attractions were also served to entertain the guests and delegates present.

The initial attraction was the Makepung Dance, which was performed by Jegog Jembrana. Makepung Dance is a typical dance from Jembrana Regency, Bali.

This dance tells about a herd of buffalo waiting for food from the shepherd. Every word from the shepherd turned into a command for the herd of buffalo.

In closing, the Ramayana Kecak dance ballet was performed as the ultimate entertainment for the guests and delegates present. Also accompanying the Vice Minister on that occasion were the echelon I and II officials within the MOTCE.

Vice Minister Angela Invites Delegates to Make WCCE a Momentum to Drive Global Creative Economy Recovery

Nusa Dua, October 5th 2022 – Vice Minister of Tourism and Creative Economy/Deputy Head of Tourism and Creative Economy, Angela Tanoesoedibjo, invites the delegates of the World Conference on Creative Economy (WCCE) which takes place on October 5-7, 2022, in Bali as a momentum to drive the recovery of the global creative economy sector.

During the Opening Session Friends of Creative Economy WCCE 2022 at the Bali International Convention Center-Westin, Nusa Dua, Bali, Wednesday (5/10/2022), Vice Minister Angela explained that the third international creative economy conference is expected to become an action to revive and recover the global creative economy sector.

“I invite the delegates that our discussion today will be an action and become an engine that drives the global creative economy to fight, not only as a driver of creative economic recovery, but also for global economic recovery and as a vehicle for achieving sustainable growth for all,” according to Angela.

She also explained that during the pandemic, the creative economy sector was affected by the pandemic, just like other sectors. However, of the 17 creative economy sub-sectors, there are several sectors that have even risen in the midst of the pandemic.

“For example, during the pandemic in Indonesia, content-based grew 10 percent and the digital-based creative economy 4 to 5 percent. In other creative industries, we see the industry coming back strong. And for the first time in history, the local film market share in higher at 61 percent,” Angela explained.

She also still saw growth in several creative economy sub-sectors, rapid recovery in others, when technology plays a role and intellectual property is properly valued as an asset. Going forward, we will also see the rise of social entrepreneurship that strengthens the value chain of the creative economy to be more responsible for social and environmental development as well as inclusiveness towards women, youth, and marginalized group.

“However, I believe there is still a lot of room to grow and take advantage of it by continuing to promote a supportive environment in our respective countries and recognizing the source of great opportunities and growth after the pandemic from the creative economy,” she added.

Vice Minister Angela also explained four sub-themes in front of the delegates, which are expected to produce important points for the recovery of the creative economy sector after the pandemic.

The four sub-themes are “Pertinent Issues and Progress on Creative Economy”, “Resilient Creative Economy for Global Goals”, “Global Creative Economy: What’s Next?”, and “Introduction of Creative Economy Roadmap”, in which, we will introduce the Bali Creative Economy Roadmap draft” that will be a reference document for this year’s WCCE results.

She explained four sub-themes that are expected to produce important points for the recovery of the creative economy sector after the pandemic. The first sub-theme is “Pertinent Issues and Progress on Creative Economy”, which will discuss the current state of the creative economy, including ecosystems, communities, setbacks, progress, and creative economy opportunities in the future.

The second is related to the “Resilient Creative Economy for Global Goals”, namely the inclusiveness and the 2030 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) agendas to encourage the resilience of the creative economy sector to answer global issues.

The third is “Global Creative Economy: What’s Next?”, in which, all parties will explore the direction of the creative economy together and look for common ways to overcome challenges and welcome prospects in this sector.

“Lastly, is the ‘Introduction of Creative Economy Roadmap’. This is where we will introduce the ‘Bali Creative Economy Roadmap draft’ which will be the reference document for this year’s WCCE results,” she added.

In short, Angela said, this draft consists of 16 action pillars that map the priorities of the creative economy for global recovery. “We invite the delegates to collaborate in finalizing it as a result document for this year’s WCCE,” she continued.

Previously, Angela also expressed her gratitude for the arrival of delegates from various countries to Bali in the midst of their tight schedule but still present on the Island of the Gods which offers hospitality, natural beauty, and culture.

“On behalf of the Government of Indonesia and the team, we thank you for your presence in Bali. I hope that the delegates can find time to enjoy the natural beauty of Bali and experience the famous Balinese hospitality,” she said.

“Creative economy is a strong source of resilience in the world amidst the VUCA (volatility, uncertainty, complexity, and ambiguity) era. I would also like to thank our colleagues at the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, our partners from day one,” Angela said.

She was also confident that the meeting and discussion at the WCCE would result in concrete actions that would become the engine of the global economy. “I believe that the creative economy will gain momentum as a global recovery effort. Not only as a driver for economic growth but also to achieve sustainable growth for all,” she concluded. Also attending the occasion were the echelon I and II officials within the MOTCE.

The G20 Underpin Policy Initiatives to Tackle Global Food Insecurity and Malnutrition at the First Joint Finance and Agriculture Deputies Meeting

Jakarta, 4 October 2022 – Joint Finance and Agriculture Deputies Meeting (JFADM) was held first time on 3 October 2022 under the Indonesian G20 Presidency, hosted by the Ministry of Finance and Ministry of Agriculture, Indonesia. The 1st JFADM was attended by G20 members, invitees, and international organizations in a virtual mode.

The G20 held the 1st JFADM in response to the growing food insecurity issues and the urgency to strengthen global collaboration. This Meeting is an escalation from the discussion on The High-Level Seminar on Strengthening Global Collaboration for Tackling Food Insecurity, which was held on July 2022 back-to-back with the 3rd Finance Minister and Central Governors’ Meeting. At the High-Level Seminar, a collaboration between the Indonesian Presidency and the Government of Saudi Arabia, the members discussed the urge to focus on short-term and long-term goals in formulating policy solutions for agriculture, trade, and social protection. In addition, the members also agreed and committed to global collective actions to ensure food affordability for all.

In this JFADM, G20 members discussed the concept note on Strengthening Global Collaboration to Tackle Food Insecurity and Malnutrition as a joint effort between G20 Finance and Sherpa tracks to discuss recent developments, identify solutions, and a way forward in addressing global food insecurity. The proposal includes the following area: financing measures, agri-food system intervention, and trade measures.

Kasdi Subagyono, the Secretary General of the Ministry of Agriculture, Indonesia, opened the 1st JFADM meeting. In his opening remarks, Kasdi said, “It is our responsibility to prove that the G20 safeguards the spirit of multilateralism, to make it deliver and to be an effective forum responding to global challenges, especially in addressing the food insecurity, and reiterate support for an open, transparent, inclusive, predictable, and non-discriminatory rules-based multilateral trading systems.” Meanwhile, following up on the previous High-Level Seminar, Suliman al-Khateeb, Deputy Minister of Agriculture, Saudi Arabia, mentioned, “I would like to emphasize the need to develop a long-term sustainable food security governance mechanism for the development of a sustainable and resilient food system that delivers food security and nutrition.”

The session was followed by a presentation from Wempi Saputra, the Assistant Minister for Macro Economy and International Finance, Ministry of Finance, and the G20 Finance Deputy, Indonesia. In his presentation, Wempi stated, “This Meeting, and the Meeting of G20 Finance and Agriculture Ministers next week will be a critical opportunity for the G20 to build momentum on G20 members’ efforts to address food security ahead of the G20 Leaders’ Summit, with special attention to fertilizers. The G20 Finance and Agriculture Ministers Meeting will also provide political support for the mapping exercise, its terms of reference, and a summary of actions by G20 members”.

Responding to the presentation of the concept from Indonesia, the G20 members expressed their strong support for bringing this initiative to a higher level with several inputs, including support for strengthening global cooperation to overcome food insecurity and malnutrition and promoting open, transparent, and fair trade. Several countries also encourage the prepared concept notes to describe more comprehensive challenges and solutions built on global alliances and high solidarity without duplicating existing strategies and efforts.

The results of this first JFADM meeting will serve as input for the first Joint Finance and Agriculture Ministers’ Meeting (JFAMM) at the 4th FMCBG, which will be held in conjunction with the IMF-World Bank Group Annual Meetings in Washington D.C, mid-October 2022.

Indonesia’s G20 Presidency, supported by all G20 members and international organizations, is committed and will continue to call for global action to ensure food affordability for all and address existing insecurity with global collaboration, including through fiscal and sectoral policy mixes.

WCCE 2022 Conference in Bali Discusses Four Major Issues in Creative Economy Sector

In an effort to revive the economy and create employment opportunities

Bali, October 3rd 2022 – The Indonesian Government c.q. Ministry of Tourism and Creative Economy /Tourism and Creative Economy Agency (MOTCE) together with the Ministry of Foreign Affairs will hold the World Conference on Creative Economy (WCCE) in Nusa Dua Bali on October 5-7, 202, with a mission of global recovery through the creative economy sector.

Four sub-themes in the creative economy will be deliberated during this third international conference. They are Creative Economy for Global Revival, Inclusivity and SDGs Agenda, IP and Rights of the Creative, and The Future of Creative Economy.

Minister of Tourism and Creative Economy/Head of Tourism and Creative Economy, Sandiaga Salahuddin Uno, in a statement in Jakarta, Monday (3/10/2022) explained that creative economy actors need to gain global recognition for their potential in promoting sustainable and resilient economic growth.

“As the whole world is ready to enter an endemic era, the world needs to quickly find ways to recover the economy to save sustainable livelihoods so that people can recover resiliently quickly. This is where the creative economy is present,” according to Minister Sandiaga.

The Indonesian Government held its first international creative economy conference in 2018. The 1st WCCE has succeeded to increase the attention and participation of many stakeholders consisting of government representatives, private sector, civil society, international organizations, media, and creative economy actors around the world.

The 1st WCCE in 2018 has produced 21 creative economy development agendas called the “Bali Agenda for Creative Economy” and has subsequently been brought into global conversation.

This is proven by the adoption of the UN Resolutions in 2019 at the 74th session of the UN General Assembly, namely the declaration of 2021 as The International Year of the Creative Economy for Sustainable Development. Furthermore, Indonesia has also established the Global Center of Excellence and International Cooperation for Creative Economy (G-CINC).

The 2nd WCCE in 2021 has been held in Dubai, the United Arab Emirates. WCCE 2021 Dubai declared the WCCE 2021 agenda, consisting of 21 points, covering the subjects, including economic benefits, youth, ecosystems, and international efforts in the development of the creative economy in the future.

The 3rd WCCE in 2022 with the theme “Inclusively Creative: A Global Recovery”, is taken from the awareness that the creative economy has become a leading sector because of its significant growth in recent years, even some sub-sectors have proven to be growing very well during the COVID-19 pandemic such as animation, applications, and game development.

The creative economy is also a contemporary economic dimension that does not look at gender differences, is non-discriminatory, and no longer depends on big capital.

Meanwhile, the Vice Minister of Tourism and Creative Economy/Deputy Head of Tourism and Creative Economy Agency, Angela Tanoesoedibjo, added that the four sub-themes are expected to be able to produce crucial points for the recovery of the creative economy sector after the pandemic. These four sub-themes, namely, first is creative economy for global revival by discussing policies that supports the creative economy sector, actors, and the entire ecosystems that seeks to develop this sector.

Second, regarding the protection and marketing of intellectual property, the rights of advertising materials, and the utilization of technology to maintain the livelihoods of creative economy actors globally.

Then the inclusiveness agenda and Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) to drive the creative economy sector to be able to answer global issues.

Lastly, the conference raised the sub-theme ‘Future of Creative Economy’ to map the development of the creative economy sector collectively in line with global changes.

“Let’s advocate our creative economy actors to gain global recognition for their potential in driving sustainable and resilient economic growth for all,” Angela said.

3rd Framework Working Group G20 : Komitmen Koordinasi Kebijakan Guna Menghadapi Tantangan Global

Jakarta, 30 September 2022 – Negara anggota G20 berkomitmen menjaga koordinasi dalam implementasi kebijakan fiskal dan moneter yang saling mendukung, serta memandang penting stabilitas sistem keuangan dan reformasi struktural dalam menghadapi tekanan global yanp kian meningkat saat ini. Demikian mengemuka dalam pertemuan ketiga sekaligus pertemuan terakhir dalam rangkaian Framework Working Group (FWG) Presidensi G20 2022. Lantunan gamelan dari pertunjukan Sekolah Menengah Kejuruan (SMK) 5 Bali jurusan seni membuka pertemuan hibrid yang dihadiri negara anggota G20, negara undangan, dan organisasi internasional tersebut di Kuta, Bali pada 29-30 September 2022. Genapnya pertemuan FWG yang berjalan dengan lancar, telah menunjukkan kapabilitas kepemimpinan lndonesia dalam menghadapi berbagai tantangan ekonomi maupun fragmentasi geopolitik.

FWG 2022 yang dipimpin oleh lndonesia dengan lndia dan lnggris sebagai co-chair merupakan tim kerja G20 yang fokus mendiskusikan upaya untuk mendorong pertumbuhan global yang kuat, berkelanjutan, berimbang dan inklusif. Pada hari pertama, International Monetary Fund (IMF) dan Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) mengawali pertemuan dengan asesmen dan outlook ekonomi global. Pertumbuhan ekonomi global akan kembali mengalami perlambatan yang lebih dalam. Perang di Ukraina telah mendorong kenaikan harga pangan, komoditas, dan energi. Tekanan pada rantai pasok masih berlanjut dan pasar tenaga kerja yang belum pulih Menambah problematika perlambatan ekonomi yang diiringi peningkatan tekanan inflasi pada hampir seluruh sektor ekonomi, sehingga meningkatkan biaya hidup dan berdampak signifikan terutama kepada kelompok rentan.

Lebih lanjut, mengemuka pentingnya kebijakan moneter untuk fokus dalam menurunkan inflasi, dan kebijakan fiskal untuk membantu kelompok rentan dalam menghadapi kondisi ekonomi yang sulit, dengan tetap memperhatikan keberlanjutan fiskal. Negara anggota juga memandang perlunya menjaga stabilitas keuangan dan juga melanjutkan reformasi struktural untuk meningkatkan produktivitas dan mendorong kapasitas demi pertumbuhan.

Negara G20 terus menyampaikan komitmennya untuk menjaga koordinasi dalam implementasi kebijakan fiskal dan moneter yang saling mendukung. Negara G20 menekankan pentingnya bauran kebijakan dalam mengatasi tantangan dan kebijakan yang dikalibrasi, direncanakan dan dikomunikasikan dengan baik agar perekonomian dapat pulih lebih cepat dan kuat. Lebih lanjut, seiring dengan krisis energi yang diperkirakan akan cukup lama, banyak negara anggota juga menekankan pentingnya reformasi sektor energi melalui percepatan transisi menuju energi terbarukan. Hari kedua pertemuan berfokus pada tinggınya harga pangan dan ancaman risiko ketahanan pangan. Harpa pangan tahun 2022 meningkat secara signıfıkan yang diperparah dengan peningkatan harga energi dan pupuk, bencana kekerıngan yang terjadi dı beberapa negara, dan juga tingkat hutang yang tinggi menjadı hambatan pembıayaan ketahanan pangan. Untuk itu, Presidensı G20 lndonesia menginısıası pertemuan antara Kementerıan Keuangan dan Kementerian Pertanian untuk mendiskusıkan upaya yang dapat dilakukan G20 untuk mengatasi kerentanan pangan. lnilah saat yang tepat untuk membangun momentum mendirıkan koordınası finanse-agrıculture secara berkelanjutan

Sebagian besar negara anggota G20 sepakat untuk terus mengatasi permasalahan kerawanan pangan melalui perdagangan pangan global, peningkatan koordinasi antar negara, pemberian bantuan bagi negara miskin, serta meningkatkan keterlibatan organisasi internasional dan lembaga pembiayaan untuk berperan dalam meningkatkan produksi dan distribusi pangan.

Pada topik diskusi lainnya yaitu risiko perubahan iklim, perlu adanya kerja sanna internasional yang dapat memastikan implementasi kebijakan terkait nef zero policy yanp merata dan juga terjangkau bagi negara-negara berkembang dan miskin. Kredibilitas kebijakan moneter dan insentif juga diyakini dapat mengurangi biaya makroekonomi dari kebijakan iklim. Network for Greening Financial System (NGFS) memaparkan perlunya transisi yang ambisius di semua sektor ekonomi. Hal ini akan lebih ekonomis ketimbang transisi tidak teratur (disorderly) yang dilakukan secara bertahap dalam jangka panjang. Negara anggota G20 bersepakat bahwa aktivitas transisi perlu segera dilakukan dengan memperhatikan kapasitas masing-masing negara, sekalipun terdapat tantangan global yang menghambat.

Presidensi G20 lndonesia, salah satunya melalui penyelenggaraan FWG dalam jalur keuangan, telah berhasil dan senantiasa mendorong negara anggota G20 dalam menjunjung semangat multilateralisme untuk mencapai pertumbuhan yanp kuat, berkelanjutan, inklusif di masa depan. Selanjutnya, pada període Presidensi G20 tahun 2023 yang akan dipimpin Índia, terdapat agenda prioritas FWG yang mencakup kerawanan pangan, implikasi makroekonomi dari perubahan iklim, dampak makro dan fiskal globalisasi keuangan di dunia pasca pandemi.

Think-20 Task Force 1 Session at the 2022 World Trade Organization Public Forum [1] “Greening Global Value Chains”

Friday, 30 September 2022/15:45-17:00 – Room: S2, WTO, Geneva

Panelists:

  • Jerry Sambuaga (Vice Minister of Trade, Republic of Indonesia)
  • Peter Draper (Professor, University of Adelaide)
  • Pramila Crivelli (Economist, Asian Development Bank)
  • Samir Saran (President, Observer Research Foundation, India)

Moderator: Yose Rizal Damuri (Executive Director, Centre for Strategic and International Studies, Indonesia/Executive Co-chair, T20 Indonesia)

While global value chains (GVCs) can be seen as an important lever for developing and emerging economies to plug into global-level production and innovation ecosystems, especially with the emergence of massive production networks, it is also known that GVC trade produces significant levels of carbon emissions, with trade emissions embedded in exports amounting to around 20%. The session, “Greening Global Value Chains”, discusses ways to make GVCs more sustainable and greener as well as some expected policy responses and actions that need to be taken at various levels, e.g., on a firm-level, national-level, as well as regional-level.

To address how the G20 can support such transformations, Vice Minister of Trade Jerry Sambuaga emphasised that there is a need to find and do collective measures. The “Collective Economic Recovery”, which outlined six (6) priority issues around aligning trade, investment, and industry agenda with Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), was one such measure that was discussed in the Trade, Investment, and Industry Ministerial Meeting (TIIMM) at the G20, 22-23 September 2022 in Bali. As the characteristics of each country are intrinsically different, Sambuaga further highlighted the need for a collective and objective cooperation by agreeing on how green environment will be defined as well as what the terms and conditions are in achieving these SDGs, whilst at the same time encouraging the participation of developing countries in such conversations. Peter Draper, a University of Adelaide Professor, focused on the WTO’s involvement in addressing environmental issues vis-a-vis trade. Draper acknowledged that while the WTO has a Committee on Trade and Environment (CTE), there is also the Trade and Environmental Sustainability Structured Discussions (TESSD) in addition to other initiatives e.g., a joint initiative on plastics pollution led by the Government of China and Fiji as well as other initiatives on fossil fuel subsidies reform. The TESSD currently has 74 participating members and is constituted of four (4) pillars, namely, trade-related climate measures;

environmental goods and services; circular economy – circularity; and subsidies. While the TESSD is an important plurilateral forum to incubate ideas and further reform initiatives, Draper recognised that it is not a formal agreement and just a discussion, and as such, further raised the question of how such initiatives would proceed, and if they do, how TESSD processes would relate to the CTE. In the context of GVCs, Draper mentioned that they are prevalent in the TESSD processes but the degree of “global” in the value chain depends on the issue being covered as well as its scope. For example, the plastics dialogue deals with a very specific issue i.e., plastics, but the Carbon Border Adjustment Mechanism (CBAM) is potentially all-encompassing. Draper further underlined that it is important to remember that businesses are not standing still in all of this and are in fact leading the charge in many ways the WTO is following, which are also ultimately reshaping value chains.

Asian Development Bank Economist, Pramila Crivelli explained how regional trade agreements (RTAs) can be a platform for environment-related trade measures, and their implications on GVCs. Crivelli stated that RTAs have a dual effect on climate change, as they promote trade, but trade itself can have both positive and negative impacts. Environmental provisions, trade facilitation, market access for environmental goods and services, and regulatory cooperation, were outlined by Crivelli to be channels by which countries can reduce their GHG emissions. However, these channels should not be a substitute for one another, e.g. trade facilitation mostly reduces delays but does not fully replace environmental provisions. Additionally, Crivelli stated that while RTAs help liberalise the trade of environmental goods, challenges arising from ambiguity in the definition of environmental goods remain. On the other hand, there are no similar multilateral nor regional initiatives to liberalise environmental services. Considering these challenges, Crivelli suggested several alternatives to RTAs, e.g. Green Industrial Policies, Memorandums of Understanding and Joint Statements of Intent (“MoUs” and “JSIs”), International Green Economy Collaborations, and Green Economy Agreements. On the RCEP, Crivelli explained that it is not the most advanced agreement – unlike the CPTPP which has set high standards on environmental protection. That said, if properly implemented, Crivelli argued that it can also promote regional value chains.

Provoking an interesting discussion on unilateral trade policy to address climate issues, President of the Observer Research Foundation, Samir Saran raised the question of whether countries “do better together” through multilateral climate policies. Saran provided an example by claiming that the CBAM potentially fails that question as it makes it difficult for countries to climb up development pathways by preventing them from using carbon of their own, and thus argued that unilateral trade policies are now made to perpetuate difference and freeze socioeconomic profiles. However, if CBAM does in fact pass the test, then Saran suggested that the tax collected through CBAM should go to developing countries. Saran further accentuated that trade and investment need to go together to truly create an economic engagement that is climate friendly, and that countries’ trade policies should thus follow their investment profiles. Saran finished by highlighting that there is an opportunity to unleash and unlock the largest savings humankind has ever known, but countries need to be smart and ensure that these savings flow along the loops of welfare and innovation.

Finally, Draper admitted that while there are several problems in the design of mechanisms such as CBAM, it is forcing the pace of regulation that the rest of the world must keep up with. Additionally, consumers nowadays are demanding and voting for politicians that represent their views, and as such, developing countries that would like to export to the EU would need to meet these standards, which ultimately has a value chain implication. Crivelli further recommended that policymakers and negotiators to always think about the implementation capacities of the different countries as this will imply signing agreements that will either never be implemented or be implemented only by the rich economies. Therefore, there is a need for further collaboration between developing and developed countries in greening the global value chains. The G20 India next year will be a suitable platform to bridge the discussion and push more effort from members to address the carbon leakage problem without harmful unilateral trade policy.

About T20 Indonesia Task Force 1

The T20 Task Force (TF) 1 on Open Trade, Sustainable Investment and Industry aims to formulate robust policy briefs that promote enabling environment and partnership for international trade, investment, and industry to drive a resilient, inclusive, and sustainable post- COVID world. This TF consists of some policy areas such as WTO reform agenda, resilient, inclusive supply chain, open, fair and green trade, sustainable investment, digital trade & digitally enabled services. Thus, the TF aims to deliver a robust, independent, and inclusive research-based policy platform for experts and impactful policy options for the G20 policy-making process.

Lead Co-Chair:

Yose Rizal Damuri (Executive Director, Centre for Strategic and International Studies)

Co-Chairs:

  • Dionisius A. Narjoko (Senior Economist at The Economic Research Institute for ASEAN & East Asia)
  • Jane Drake-Brockman (Visiting Fellow, Institute for International Trade, The University of Adelaide)
  • Albert F. Park (Chief Economist and Director General of the Asian Development Bank/ADB)
  • Andreas Freytag (Professor of Economics at the Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena)
  • Manjeet Kripalani (Executive Director, Gateway House)

From Fruits to Various Local Foods, Agricultural Product Exhibition Enlivened the G20 AMM in Bali

Bali (28/9) – The Agriculture Ministers Meeting (AMM) was held in Bali on September 27–29, 2022. This meeting was the pinnacle of the G20 Agriculture Working Group (AWG) series of meetings. For the whole day, exhibitions of agricultural products enlivened the AMM.
 
The Director of the Public Relations and Information Bureau of the Ministry of Agriculture (MoA), Kuntoro Boga Andri, said that the delegates had the opportunity to enjoy various agricultural products at the exhibition, like fruits and local food. He further explained that the exhibition also displayed products from many commodities, like food crops, horticulture, plantations, and livestock.
 
“Some products displayed include food crops, like organic rice, mocaf-based food, and shirataki rice; horticulture products, like local mangoes, snake fruits, bananas, mangosteen, and oranges; plantation products, like coconut, chocolate, tea; and livestock products, like veterinary drugs, maggots, shredded meat, and milk. 
 
Kuntoro mentioned that the exhibition concept was in line with the AWG’s theme this year, which is “Balancing Food Production and Trade to Fulfill Food for All”. For the record, the AMM exhibition was organized based on the three main priority issue, the first being promoting resilient and sustainable agriculture and food systems.
 
“The second issue is promoting an open, fair, predictable and transparent agricultural trade to ensure food availability and affordability for all. The final issue is innovative agri-preneurship through digital agriculture to improve farmers’ livelihood in rural areas,” He elaborated.
 
He stated that the exhibition served as the right platform for Indonesia to showcase their agriculture sector. He hoped that everyone will see the potential that the Indonesia’s agriculture sector has to produce various quality products.
 
“There is also a special booth for agricultural SMEs, where the delegates can observe many agricultural products, including shirataki rice, cricket flour, and other products that have entered the global market, like bird nest,” explained Kuntoro.
 
In line with Kuntoro, the Director General of Food Crops, Suwandi, who was appointed as the responsible official for the AMM Mini Exhibition Display, said that a few themes were raised for the exhibition, including food resilience and local food promotion, as a substitute for imported food.
 
Furthermore, Suwandi mentioned that there are two steps to take in facing the threat of global food crisis, namely diversifying local food production and consumption, by increasing the production of sorghum, cassava, corn, soybeans and others.
 
“Currently, we are intensifying the expansion of sorghum production as local food that is similar to wheat. Sorghum is easy to cultivate and can be harvested up to three times in one planting,” added Suwandi.
 
For information, the G20 AMM was attended physically and virtually by 188 foreign delegates; 168 delegates of whom attended the meeting in-person. The delegates were representatives of all G20 members, 7 invited countries, and 8 international organizations.

Bali (28/9) – The Agriculture Ministers Meeting (AMM) was held in Bali on September 27–29, 2022. This meeting was the pinnacle of the G20 Agriculture Working Group (AWG) series of meetings. For the whole day, exhibitions of agricultural products enlivened the AMM.
 
The Director of the Public Relations and Information Bureau of the Ministry of Agriculture (MoA), Kuntoro Boga Andri, said that the delegates had the opportunity to enjoy various agricultural products at the exhibition, like fruits and local food. He further explained that the exhibition also displayed products from many commodities, like food crops, horticulture, plantations, and livestock.
 
“Some products displayed include food crops, like organic rice, mocaf-based food, and shirataki rice; horticulture products, like local mangoes, snake fruits, bananas, mangosteen, and oranges; plantation products, like coconut, chocolate, tea; and livestock products, like veterinary drugs, maggots, shredded meat, and milk. 
 
Kuntoro mentioned that the exhibition concept was in line with the AWG’s theme this year, which is “Balancing Food Production and Trade to Fulfill Food for All”. For the record, the AMM exhibition was organized based on the three main priority issue, the first being promoting resilient and sustainable agriculture and food systems.
 
“The second issue is promoting an open, fair, predictable and transparent agricultural trade to ensure food availability and affordability for all. The final issue is innovative agri-preneurship through digital agriculture to improve farmers’ livelihood in rural areas,” He elaborated.
 
He stated that the exhibition served as the right platform for Indonesia to showcase their agriculture sector. He hoped that everyone will see the potential that the Indonesia’s agriculture sector has to produce various quality products.
 
“There is also a special booth for agricultural SMEs, where the delegates can observe many agricultural products, including shirataki rice, cricket flour, and other products that have entered the global market, like bird nest,” explained Kuntoro.
 
In line with Kuntoro, the Director General of Food Crops, Suwandi, who was appointed as the responsible official for the AMM Mini Exhibition Display, said that a few themes were raised for the exhibition, including food resilience and local food promotion, as a substitute for imported food.
 
Furthermore, Suwandi mentioned that there are two steps to take in facing the threat of global food crisis, namely diversifying local food production and consumption, by increasing the production of sorghum, cassava, corn, soybeans and others.
 
“Currently, we are intensifying the expansion of sorghum production as local food that is similar to wheat. Sorghum is easy to cultivate and can be harvested up to three times in one planting,” added Suwandi.
 
For information, the G20 AMM was attended physically and virtually by 188 foreign delegates; 168 delegates of whom attended the meeting in-person. The delegates were representatives of all G20 members, 7 invited countries, and 8 international organizations.