G20germany

G20 summit flags

The G20 at a glance

The G20 is the central forum for international cooperation on financial and economic questions. At their meetings, which have been held annually since 2008, the heads of state and government of the G20 have traditionally addressed issues relating to world economic growth, international trade and the regulation of financial markets. more: The G20 at a glance …

World map showing the member countries of the G20

Summit participants

The "Group of Twenty" is made up of 19 countries and the European Union. The countries are: Argentina, Australia, Brazil, Canada, China, France, Germany, India, Indonesia, Italy, Japan, Mexico, Russia, Saudi Arabia, South Africa, South Korea, Turkey, the United Kingdom and the USA. more: Summit participants …

Calendar

Calendar

Before the G20 leaders meet on 7 and 8 July 2017, a number of other events will be held. Alongside the line ministers’ meetings and the Chancellor’s dialogue with civil society, there will be numerous other sessions to prepare the ground for the G20 summit. more: Calendar …

Aerial photograph of Hamburg

Conference venue: Hamburg

The G20 summit under the German Presidency will be held on 7 and 8 July 2017 in Hamburg. The 20 heads of state and government and top-level representatives of international organisations will meet at Hamburg Messe, the city’s exhibition and trade fair centre. more: Conference venue: Hamburg …

View of documents with the logo of the German G20 presidency

Overview of summit documents

At the end of each summit the heads of state and government of the G20 issue a joint declaration regarding the most important outcomes of their meeting. Below is a list of the most important documents since 2008. A final declaration will also be issued following the summit in Hamburg. more: Overview of summit documents …

Chancellor Angela Merkel and young people at the Federal Chancellery

Meeting with civil society

During Germany's Presidency, the Chancellor will also be engaging in a comprehensive dialogue with civil society. She is meeting representatives of the science and research community, the business community and the trade unions as well as non-governmental organisations, young people and women from G20 states. more: Meeting with civil society …

German Finance Minister Wolfgang Schäuble at a G20 press conference on 7 October 2016 in Washington, D.C.

Ministers meetings and working groups

The G20 stands for more than two-day summits. It is a process that has been developing since 2008 at the level of heads of state and government. The economic and financial policy agenda of the leaders’ meetings has been broadened, as had also increasingly been the case of the finance ministers’ and international central banks’ work within the forum. more: Ministers meetings and working groups …

Working session of the world finance summit in the Great Hall of the National Building Museum at the G20 summit in Washington DC (15.11.2008)

A historical overview

From crisis manager to the central forum for international economic cooperation: a look at the history of the G20 summit demonstrates that the answers to global challenges must be found together. The G20 was first launched at the G7's Cologne summit in 1999. more: A historical overview …

A list of questions on a blackboard - "where?", "what?", "when?", "why?", "who?" and "how?"

Frequently Asked Questions

What is the point of the G20? Why, in the age of the internet, do the heads of state and government have to meet in person, why can’t they hold a web conference? Why do they hold their summits in places like Messe Hamburg and not in their capital cities? Find out the answers to these and other questions here. more: Frequently Asked Questions …